Laurent de Sutter: Narcocapitalism

There’s always the nostalgia of something with the concept of biopolitics. And it’s even more visible with Agamben. I mean I love Agamben...but I must confess that there is something that I cannot accept...the underlying nostalgia for something that would be pure and authentic.
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 photo credit: Geraldine Jacques

photo credit: Geraldine Jacques

Laurent de Sutter discusses his book Narcocapitalism with Chris Richardson. De Sutter (°1977) is Professor of Legal Theory at Vrije Universiteit Brussel. He is the author of a dozen books translated into several languages, and dedicated to the endless exploration of the possibilities of thought outside philosophy. He is the editor of the "Theory Redux" series at Polity Press, and the "Perspectives Critiques" series at Presses Universitaires de France. Besides his academic and publishing career, he is very active in contemporary media and cultural life as a curator of many public events or as a columnist for major newspapers and radio shows. He has often been featured in the top 100 of cultural personalities of the year by various French magazines.

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